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Monday, January 07, 2013

Type 2 diabetes is a fully preventable condition

COMMENT from Ted Hutchinson -

@ Mozza 
One aspect of Mercola's article that may not have been given sufficient emphasis is the
"Optimize your gut flora."
Most people who have been overweight will inevitably have a pathogenic gut flora, While the suggestions Mercola makes for reseeding with good gut microbiota are sensible they do not address the problem of displacing pathogenic gut flora.
If we look at this example
An opportunistic pathogen isolated from the gut of an obese human causes obesity we see that as well as providing prebiotics, they also used BITTER MELON, and Chinese herbs to eliminate the pathogens. 
They managed to get blood glucose levels into the normal range (there volunteer was not diabetics yet)But other type I diabetics have managed to do that using carbohydrate reduction. 
Mercola's article also fails to mention that in order for Vitamin D to switch from the circulating form, (calcidiol) to the active hormonal form (calcitriol) the presence of magnesium is required. During hyperglycemia diabetics excrete MAGNESIUM therefore all diabetics are magnesium deficient. Unless diabetics take MORE MAGNESIUM than the current low RDA for magnesium they will never restore optimum magnesium status and will not therefore have optimum control over the actions of vitamin D3. 100mg of magnesium chelate with each meal and ideally 100mg of magnesium taurate before bed. 
You may find that using up to 6g of taurine daily also helps improve matters. 
Potential role of taurine in the prevention of diabetes
and metabolic syndrome
 



POST

The truth of the matter is that type 2 diabetes is a fully preventable condition that arises from faulty leptin signaling and insulin resistance, both of which are directly diet- and exercise-related. It is NOT a disease of blood sugar.
Once you understand that, the remedy becomes clear: To reverse the disease, you need to recover your body's insulin and leptin sensitivities. The ONLY way to accomplish this is through proper diet and exercise, as detailed in my free Nutrition Plan. Bariatric surgery, which is being increasingly recommended as a diabetes treatment, will NOT do the trick, and there is NO drug that can correct leptin signaling and insulin resistance... Adhering to the following guidelines can help you do at least three things that are essential for successfully treating diabetes: recover your insulin/leptin sensitivity; normalize your weight; and normalize your blood pressure:
  • Severely limit or eliminate sugar and grains in your diet, especially fructose which is far more detrimental than any other type of sugar. Following my Nutrition Plan will help you do this without too much fuss.
  • Exercise regularly. Exercise is an absolutely essential factor, and without it, you're unlikely to get this devastating disease under control. It is one of the fastest and most powerful ways to lower your insulin and leptin resistance. If you're unsure of how to get started, I recommend reviewing my Peak Fitness program for tips and guidelines.
  • Avoid trans fats.
  • Get plenty of omega-3 fats from a high quality, animal-based source, such as krill oil.
  • Optimize your vitamin D levels. Recent studies have revealed that getting enough vitamin D can have a powerful effect on normalizing your blood pressure and that low vitamin D levels may increase your risk of heart disease.
  • Optimize your gut flora. Your gut is a living ecosystem, full of both good bacteria and bad. Multiple studies have shown that obese people have different intestinal bacteria than lean people. The more good bacteria you have, the stronger your immune system will be and the better your body will function overall. Fortunately, optimizing your gut flora is relatively easy. You can reseed your body with good bacteria by eating fermented foods (such as fermented vegetables, natto, raw organic cheese, or raw milk kefir) or by taking a high-quality probiotic supplement.
  • Address any underlying emotional issues and/or stress. Non-invasive tools like the Emotional Freedom Technique can be helpful and effective.
  • Get enough high-quality sleep every night.
  • Monitor your fasting insulin level. This is every bit as important as your fasting blood sugar. You'll want your fasting insulin level to be between 2 and 4. The higher your level, the worse your insulin sensitivity is.

Diet and Healthy Aging

In related news, an article in the New England Journal of Medicine4 reviewed the conflicting research on calorie restriction and mortality.
"Two long-term studies of the effect of calorie restriction in rhesus monkeys conflict: one concludes that restriction does not affect mortality, and the other concludes that it does. Differences in dietary composition and extent of restriction may explain the discrepant results," Linda Partridge, PhD, writes.
Yes, as always, the devil is in the details, and this is particularly true when it comes to diet. A calorie is not "just a calorie," for example. There's every reason to believe that the key to improved health and longevity lies not in calorie restriction per se, but in restricting certain kinds of calories—calories from sugars, to be specific. And possibly also those from poor quality proteins.
Dr. Ron Rosedale has been passionate about diabetes and aging for over 30 years and he is constantly reviewing the literature in this area. He is one of my primary mentors on this topic. He is convinced, as most other experts are, that calorie restriction does indeed provide life extension. But it is likely not because there are decreased total calories. He believes the key is to limit the carbs and excessive protein. The fat calories are "essentially free' and do not impair insulin or leptin signaling, or the mTOR pathways, which can contribute to decreased longevity.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/01/07/diabetes-remission.aspx?e_cid=20130107_DNL_art_1

8 comments:

muzza3 said...

Guess what , have been doing this for nearly 12 months, lost 15 kgs and I am now at an optimal weight for my height,regular exise , I work 10 hours per day , so reasonably fit.Eat yogurt , make my own, doeny eat very few carbs of any sort.and no bread. pasta rice or potatoes and you no what .

My bloods have not changed one iota, I am still needing to take insulin on a daily basis.
So bollocks to that idea.
I am not increasing my intake ,and not thrashing my pancreas with drugs , but overall I am still a type 2 diabetic.






Tapestry said...

Don't give up Muzza. My experience of recovery from illness is that it takes time. We have big expectations of quick recoveries, but in truth things happen very gradually. Years not months. It took seven years for my blood pressure to come back into balance, and heart beat to come back up from 35, now about 58. Maybe the recovery of the pancreas will be a similar time frame. You're making a big effort. Maybe stress is another factor.

Anonymous said...

My partner has type 1 diabetes. She's 35 now and got it/was diagnosed at about 18. Insulin dependency is obviously paramount. Diet helps a lot too and I agree about diet being important for type 2 diabetes - and type 2 diabetes can be beaten with healthy balanced diet alone.

So many people are walking around with type 2 diabetes and don't even realise it. Even the NHS admits this. However, the NHS still want to give you Big-Pharma 'supplements' which can actually lead to type 1 diabetes and then you are screwed because you can then become dependent on Big-Pharma 'insulin', To be fair, type 1 diabetes can be brought on by numerous things: a stressful traumatic event can do it as your immune system just goes pear-shaped and you go into near shock and your organs take a beating.

As a side note, look at research into healthy pancreatic cells being injected into the pancreas of people with type 1/2 diabetes, if you are interested.

State run 'health care is all about profit not health. If you are not deemed profitable to cure then you end up on eugenics programmes like 'Liverpool Care Pathway'. A lot of diabetics don't last beyond 60/70 which is funnily enough the age the state want you working till... after that the state consider you unprofitable to society.

What a sick world we live in (literally)... keep healthy.

Anonymous said...

... just like to add to the above which I posted. My partner gave birth to our daughter 18 months ago.

Diabetes and pregnancy is a balancing act. It's already hard enough with healthy women and pregnancy... try it with type 1 diabetes.

Blood sugar levels and diet are really critical and we had a specialist we had to see every 2 weeks - not for the pregnancy - but for checking up on mum's health in general. Don't forget mum is keeping baby alive through the umbilical cord and if mum isn't healthy then baby isn't healthy too.

1 week before my partner gave birth she was brought into hospital as mum and baby weren't healthy. Mum's blood sugar levels dropped below 1 and I could have lost mum and baby. What the doctors do is inject the mother with a massive Glucagon injection to rapidly raise blood sugar levels.

Thankfully mum and baby are healthy. Diabetes effects your health in more ways than the general public are told however. I certainly don't think there's enough coverage of the effects of diabetes by the government/mainstream media considering how many people suffer from it.

TedHutchinson said...

@ Mozza
One aspect of Mercola's article that may not have been given sufficient emphasis is the
"Optimize your gut flora."
Most people who have been overweight will inevitably have a pathogenic gut flora, While the suggestions Mercola makes for reseeding with good gut microbiota are sensible they do not address the problem of displacing pathogenic gut flora.
If we look at this example
An opportunistic pathogen isolated from the gut of an obese human causes obesity we see that as well as providing prebiotics, they also used BITTER MELON, and Chinese herbs to eliminate the pathogens.
They managed to get blood glucose levels into the normal range (there volunteer was not diabetics yet)But other type I diabetics have managed to do that using carbohydrate reduction.
Mercola's article also fails to mention that in order for Vitamin D to switch from the circulating form, (calcidiol) to the active hormonal form (calcitriol) the presence of magnesium is required. During hyperglycemia diabetics excrete MAGNESIUM therefore all diabetics are magnesium deficient. Unless diabetics take MORE MAGNESIUM than the current low RDA for magnesium they will never restore optimum magnesium status and will not therefore have optimum control over the actions of vitamin D3. 100mg of magnesium chelate with each meal and ideally 100mg of magnesium taurate before bed.
You may find that using up to 6g of taurine daily also helps improve matters.
Potential role of taurine in the prevention of diabetes
and metabolic syndrome

satish said...

Type II diabetes can preventable take precognitions like weight etc.

Unicityin said...

Take a apple every day, maintain your BMI, food habit etc. can help to prevent Type II diabetes.

Tapestry said...

Apples - yes but eat the pips, OK. They will help prevent cancer. B17.